Maine Editorial Photographer/Photojournalist » Professional Maine Photography Brunswick Portland ME

Bar/Bat Mitzvah Planner

Bar/Bat Mitzvah Planner

  • The most important purpose of the form is to get the names of family members and friends who you want to make sure I capture in photos. I’ll use your answers to create a schedule of posed photos so, please use the names that people would want to be called, not necessarily their given names, e.g., Missy instead of Melissa, Bob instead of Robert.

    You do not have to fill out this entire form in one session. You should see a button that says "Save and Continue Later" for when you need to take a break. It's probably a good idea to hit the "Save and Continue Later" button every 30 minutes or so while you are working, just to make sure no work is inadvertently lost by a power failure or a software or hardware issue.

    Apparently the "Save and Continue Later" link expires after 30 days, so please don't let 30 days run without coming back and finishing the form.

    When you are completely done with the form, please hit the "Submit" button so I'll know you're done.

    After you've finished the form, we will set up a time for a conference (in person or by phone) to discuss your schedule and how much time to set aside for posed photos.

    If there are a few items you need to change or add after you've hit submit, you can email them to me, but for now, please do your best to provide as much information as you can in this form so our conference can be as thorough as possible. )

    Thanks again for asking me to provide your photography. I look forward to working with you and your family!

  • Primary contact/decision maker for this job

  • Family information

  • Your vision for the Bar/Bat Mitzvah

  • Service photos

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  • (I don't want to trip up and violate any rules.)
  • Rituals / moments you want captured at the service

    Though we can always add photos and groupings at the last minute, it's best to make your list ahead of time, so you don't forget a very important photograph in the pressure of the moment. A list also helps make sure we get everyone and everything we need to the ceremony on time.
  • Rather then work from a one-size-fits-all shot list, I prefer that you tell me which moments are important to your family.

    Here is a fairly typical slate to get you thinking about which photos you want.

    • Mitzvah child reading speech
    • Parents placing tallit on child
    • Parents offering worlds of wisdom
    • Mitzvah child with clergy
    • Parent passing Torah to child
    • Mitzvah child holding Torah
    • Mitzvah child receiving blessing from Clergy
    • Mitzvah child reading from Torah
    • Mitzvah child and immediate family gathered while reading Torah
  • It won't hurt to also include a photo of this item in your list (above).
  • Groups/portraits you want captured at the service

  • Again, rather than use a one-size-fits-all shot list, I would love for you to tell me who is important to your family. For example, if there are divorces or blended families, we might need to organize versions of certain groups with--or without--particular people in order to make everyone happy.

    In your list please include the names for any persons not already identified in this questionaire along with their relationship to the child. For example, 1. Mitzvah child, parents and siblings (no names needed because you're already given me the names above) 2. Mitzvah child + uncle & aunt (Barry & Sylvia Berger) & cousins (Annie & Zack).

    To determine how long your list will take, budget five minutes per group of five or less; add one minute per person for larger groups. If you want to shoot at multiple locations, we'll need to including the travel time.

    Suggestions: You likely will be gathering friends and family that you see only at special occasions, so it's important to make photos when you have a professional photographer available. On the other hand, a long list of posed photos will drag you down rather quickly, so resist the temptation to list every possible combination of people. Instead, think in groups, e.g., "all the Berg cousins" versus each set of cousins at one time. Also, think twice before you duplicate groupings, e.g., shoot the very same group at the ceremony and again at the party. Don't be tempted to add a photo to the list just because you saw it suggested online. Think "Who will actually want this photo? Will anyone include it in an album? Put it in a frame?" If no one actually wants it, don't waste your precious time posing for it. The candid photos that capture the spirit of your day tend to be more fun than posed photos, and this is what I'll spend my time shooting when I'm not shooting posed photos. So, don't think you'll get fewer photos if your shot list is tailored. It only affects the proportion of posed photos versus candid shots. I.e, if you're posed list is short, you'll get more candid shots.

    Here is a fairly typical slate to get you thinking about which photos you want.

    • Mitzvah child alone
    • Mitzvah child with parents, individually and together
    • Mitzvah child with parents and siblings
    • Mitzvah child with parents, siblings and grandparents
    • Generational shot, e.g., female child with mother, grandmother or male child with father, grandfather
    • Mitzvah child with maternal grandparents
    • Mitzvah child with paternal grandparents
    • Paternal grandparents alone
    • Maternal grandparents alone
    • Parents alone
    • Mitzvah child with clergy
  • Is there is anyone who has physical limitations that affect picture-taking? Or is overly self-conscious about a physical feature? Any very old or very young guests who are leaving early? Please share anything I should be warned about.
  • Party information

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  • :
  • If you are planning anything out of the ordinary such as sparklers, fireworks or any surprises for guests, I need to be warned (before the day) as these items often require special equipment and planning.
  • Groups/portraits you want captured at or before the party

  • Sometimes the logistics work out for getting one giant photo of everyone in attendance. Or maybe you want a group shot of just the young guests. If so, let's talk about when is best to take this shot.
  • Again, rather than use a one-size-fits-all shot list, I would love for you to tell me who is important to your family.

    Please include the names for any persons not already identified in this questionaire along with their relationship to the child.

    To determine how long your list will take, budget five minutes per group of five or less; add one minute per person for larger groups. If you want to shoot at multiple locations, we'll need to including the travel time.

    A long list of posed photos will drag you down rather quickly, so resist the temptation to include everyone on your list. Think in groups, e.g., "all the Berg cousins" versus each set of cousins at one time.

    Also, think twice before you duplicate shots there were already taken at the service. We can do that if you want, but maybe you'd rather use your time to take photos of guests who haven't already been in pictures?

    Here are some suggestions to get you thinking about which photos you might want.

    • Aunts & Uncles
    • Mitzvah child with cousins
    • Mother with all her siblings & Parents
    • Father with his siblings & Parents
    • Child with very best friends
  • If any of the groups that you want photographed during the party contain more than just a few people, it makes sense to have one person in charge of rounding up that group. For each group, please name the group and designate a point-person whose job is to round up everyone in his/her group and then come tell the photographer "I have the such-and-such group ready, where do you want us?” Please give me the group name, the point person and the approximate number of people in the group.
  • All the relatives on the mother's side/Point Person Mother)(15 people)
  • Father's Work friends/Point person Mary Smith (14 people)
  • Unless your gathering is very small, I simply can’t promise that I’ll get a photo of everyone there. It’s just not possible unless I spend the whole event walking around with a list in my hand crossing off names. I’ve asked for names of all family members so I can focus on them. But, I also need to know if there is anyone else who absolutely has to be in a photo. Maybe it’s a very special family friend? Or the child's very closest friends? Please tell me about these people so I can make sure to seek them out.
  • Is there is anyone who has physical limitations that affect picture-taking? Or is overly self-conscious about a physical feature? Any very old or very young guests who are leaving early? Please share anything I should be warned about.
  • Other vendors

    Sometimes other vendors will ask for photos for social media, blogs and websites. If you're okay with me sharing your photos, it would be helpful to have a list of your other vendors.
  • A special note about videographers

    I pride myself on being as unobtrusive as possible. I try to find a spot where I will not block guests or interfere with their experience. If you plan to hire a videographer and want recommendations, I'd love to share names with you.
  • After the event

    Please let me know if you change mailing or email addresses before you have all the product that you are due (digital images, album, prints). Thanks!
  • Feedback

    After the work is finished, if you have time, I’d love (by email) any feedback that you want to share. And, it doesn't have to be just about photography. I'm often asked to recommend venues and vendors, so if you want to share something that I can pass along to other clients considering the same venue or vendors, that's wonderful.
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